The place where I do things, nothing sexual.
Hufflepuff.
Add me
Skype: masterwandy
Dev Perfume Ask Sexy Model Mystery Link
source

July 30thvia and source with 53,265 notes



source

July 30thvia and source with 66,702 notes



“There are two reasons why people don’t talk about things; either it doesn’t mean anything to them, or it means everything”
Luna Adriana (via silly-luv)

July 30thvia and with 358,123 notes



Natalie Dormer on Women and Body Image in Hollywood during SDCC 2014 (x)

source

July 29thvia and source with 26,821 notes



yourtickettothemultiverse:

Storm #1
source

July 29thvia and source with 370 notes



willowbambi:

boromirs:

the end of an adventure

my heart

source

July 29thvia and source with 15,943 notes



the-hatred-machine:

kareshy:

gigaguess:

mrsdevilla:

the-treble:

internationalgirl:

This is why you should have a cat y’all. Egyptians believed that cats repelled evil spirits.

Cats are evil spirits. They’re just the strongest so all others must bow to their greatness.

Actually according to legend, cats are guardians of the Underworld. So once you are dead if you try to sneak back into the land of the living they send you back where you came from. They protect the living from the dead.

If you ever wonder why a cat stares off into the wild blue yonder and then bolts off for “no reason…”

That cat even looks like it’s accusing him of something like wait a Fucking minute here are you dead did you really think you could slip that shit passed me

I don’t know where you get your sources but cats were not fucking “guardians of the underworld”; this movie is based on EGYPT, cats were common domestic pets by the time Egypt unified, and they were representations of the goddess Bastet, ex goddess of warfare (formerly asociated with a lioness ), post-unification protector goddess. Cats were guardians of houses because they embodied the representation of Bastet, the “EYE of Ra”, the one that tells ra whatever happens. If a cat saw an evil spirit, it would tell Ra, and Ra would smite down the fucker in an instant. Bastet was also feared by evil spirits because she was the only one to be able to harm the evil snake Apep and save Ra’s ass, so you bet someone that escaped Anubis’ judgement and Osiris’ preservation would do well to fear Bastet out of fear of being caught by said gods.
They were seen as this as well because they disposed of rats and snakes (perhaps an egyptian once saw a cat killing a snake and went "OH BAST JUST KILLED APEP" and that’s how the mythos started), so they were useful animals to keep as pets, revered, adored, mourned when they died, and if you killed one you received death penalty.

The only animal seen as a “guardian of the underworld” were jackals, because they embodied Anubis and were seen near tombs, but that’s because they entered said tombs to try and eat the corpses and the egyptians based their entire Anubis lore on them.

So yeah, if you were an evil emperor that escaped the process of the gods you once worshipped, unleashed curses around the world disrespecting your own pantheon, and you came across an avatar of the goddess of Warfare that could also call upon Ra to pulverize you with sunlight, and have your soul sundered by Osiris and weighted by Anubis to go to your rightful place as someone who perished AGES ago, you would shit on your pants as well.

image

source

July 29thvia and source with 236,339 notes



transgalacticwanderer:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

FUCK YEAH BREAD HISTORY!!! This is one of the many reasons I FUCKING LOVE being a baker! :3

source

July 28thvia and source with 139,699 notes



ju5t4n3rd:

so yeah schools coming up and that sucks but you know what else is coming up? ugly sweaters and scarves and PUMPKIN SPICE LATTES AND HALLOWEEN AND CUDDLING BECAUSE ITS COLD AND FALL LEAVES AND HIKING IN THE BRISK AIR AND THEN AFTER THAT SNOW AND HOT COCOA AND MALLS DECORATED FOR HOLIDAYS AND FRICK SCHOOL ALL OF THIS IS WORTH IT WOWIE

July 28thvia and with 149,483 notes



castiel-is-wonderful:

sionainnlindsay:

castiel-is-wonderful:

WAIT HOLD THE FUCK UP

IS ‘MRS’ JUST MR’S 

LIKE BELONGING TO MR

OMG

Mr comes from the French monsieur, which I think literally translates as ‘my lord’ and basically just means master, and Mrs comes from maistre which is the feminine form of master, so actually—for once—no.

This was an extremely relevant comment and I thank you for educating me 

source

July 28thvia and source with 224,856 notes



tentacletheremin:

quinntessencemeister:

m-azing:

#what the fucking shit why would you do this

who the fuck told you this was ok

But it also tells the happiest.

image

Sine and cosine are just as similar as parallel lines.

And they meet each other, over and over, at regular intervals, forever.

source

July 28thvia and source with 22,285 notes



It’s 2014 and I still don’t have the last book. omfg. I fucking hate myself. ;-; someone lend me the book or something…or give it to me.

July 28th — and with 0 notes



next »